Sports

2022 Champion For Equality Award Recipient

Alexis Ohanian

Founder of Seven Seven Six; Co-Founder of Reddit; lead founding investor in the professional women’s soccer team Angel City FC; outspoken advocate for paid family leave

Alexis Ohanian is amplifying women’s sports for what it is, “damn good business.” As co-founder and lead investor in Angel City FC, he issued a call-to-action for society to follow his lead and invest in women’s sports, confidently challenging all to “check the receipts in a decade.” A visionary entrepreneur, he invests in the future of girls and women through sports, venture capital and family leave advocacy. For his unwavering commitment to level the playing field – on the pitch, in the boardroom and in the halls of Congress – and inspiring a whole new generation of male leaders to become allies and take the smart bet on women, he is the 2022 Champion for Equality Award recipient.

Ohanian was born in Brooklyn, N.Y. and grew up in the suburbs of Baltimore, M.D. He is an entrepreneur and investor widely known for knocking his business deals out of the park. He co-founded Reddit, one of the largest websites in the United States, which was funded by Y Combinator in 2005 and sold to Conde Nast in 2006. He returned as executive chairman in 2014 to help lead the turnaround of the now independent company that today is valued at over $10B. In 2016, he left Reddit to run the venture capital firm he co-founded, Initialized Capital, and built it to $100B in market value through early investments in companies like Coinbase, Opendoor, Instacart, Patreon, and Ro. 

He is a husband and has become one of the most recognized ‘girl dads’ – roles that encourage him to use his entrepreneurial skills to build a better world for all. After the murder of George Floyd, he considered a future conversation he’d have with his daughter, Olympia, about what he did to create a more equitable world online and offline for her. He resigned from the board of Reddit in June of 2020 in protest – relieved that Reddit fulfilled his wish to have his seat filled by a Black director and started taking steps to curb hate on the platform. 

In 2020, Ohanian also left Initialized Capital to launch Seven Seven Six, a firm built like a technology company that deploys venture capital. Since its inception, Seven Seven Six has already grown to oversee $769 million AUM. Fast forward to this year, he has officially launched the 776 Foundation to support marginalized individuals and announced a $20M commitment to climate action through his new 776 Fellowship Program

His advocacy on behalf of paid family leave demonstrates that his commitment to gender equity goes beyond women’s sports. Ohanian has lobbied for federal legislation that mandates quality paid family leave for all – birth parents, adoptive parents, and caregivers. As he penned in a 2019 New York Times opinion article, “All people deserve fulfilling work and close family ties.” He is especially focused on normalizing paternal paid time off, challenging a generation of dads to take the full opportunity if they get the chance. It’s an issue he dives into on his podcast, “Business Dad,” where he interviews other fathers about what it means to be a dad in today’s world and how they balance their careers and families.

Whether he is catching an Angel City home game at Banc of California Stadium or advocating for change on Capitol Hill, this savvy start-up investor strives to devote his time and skills to build a more equitable world, not only for women in sports but for families and the communities they live in.

Read more about our Awards >>

2022 Billie Jean King Leadership Award Recipient

Dawn Staley

Head Coach of the South Carolina Gamecocks, 2017 and 2022 NCAA Champions; Naismith Hall of Fame basketball player and coach; five-time WNBA all-star; advocate for gender and racial equality

There are billions of people in this world, but there is only one Dawn Staley. Certainly, the accomplishments Staley has achieved during her decades-long basketball career are significant, but her leadership goes beyond statistics and sports highlights. She is fierce, unapologetic and tenacious in using her platform to speak out against inequities, advocate for increased opportunities for women in sports, and leads with purpose. That is why she is the 2022 Billie Jean King Leadership Award recipient.  

Catapulting South Carolina into the national spotlight, Staley has made the Gamecocks a mainstay in the battle for Southeastern Conference (SEC) and national championships since starting with the university in 2008. Under her leadership, the Gamecocks have reached many firsts: Staley made history as the first Black woman to win two NCAA National Championships as head coach, in addition to guiding the team to NCAA Final Fours, No. 1 rankings, SEC regular-season and tournament titles, SEC Players of the Year, National Players of the Year, WNBA No. 1 Draft pick and No. 1 recruiting classes – to name a notable few. 

In her 22nd season as head coach, Staley has led her college teams to 12 25-win seasons, a total of 18 postseason appearances, two Women’s National Invitational Tournaments and 147 weeks in the Associated Press top 10, including 44 in the No. 1 spot – the sixth most number of times in the top spot in the history of that poll.

Staley is an advocate to her core. With over 30 years of experience in the spotlight, she does not hesitate to teach, speak out and hold institutions accountable for the inequities in sports and beyond. When the ‘madness’ of the NCAA’s tournament in 2021 showed glaring disparities between the women’s and men’s facilities, she used her platform to bring national attention to the issue – which went well beyond barbells and swag bags – urging the NCAA to re-evaluate how they value women. She continues speaking out to this day, calling out institutions for how they market women’s sports and how they could be doing more to create an equitable playing field for all women in sports. 

While we celebrate Staley’s historic coaching milestones, let’s not forget she was an outstanding player as well. She was an integral part of the 1996 U.S. Olympic team – whose success and popularity helped pave the way for the creation of the WNBA – and is still recognized today as one of the most decorated players in the U.S. women’s basketball history. She broke out on the international scene in 1989, making her first appearance in a USA Basketball uniform as a member of the 1989 Junior World Championship Team and 15 years later played her final international game after assisting the organization to a 196-10 record. She also has quite an impressive medal collection – as an athlete she won three Olympic gold medals, two FIBA World Championship gold medals, one bronze and seven international invitational titles from 1989-2004. Flash forward to her USA Basketball coaching career, and Staley continued to land on the top podium, serving as an assistant coach on the 2008 and 2016 Olympic gold medal teams and leading the U.S. to gold in the 2020 Olympics as the head coach. 

Following the 1996 Olympic Games, Staley joined the Richmond Rage of the ABL, one of the two women’s basketball professional leagues started in the wake of USA Basketball’s success on the world stage. After two all-star seasons with the organization, she switched leagues, beginning with the WNBA in 1999 – playing for the Charlotte Sting and Houston Comets before announcing her retirement in 2005. Following her retirement, the WNBA began awarding the Dawn Staley Community Leadership Award in 2007, honoring the player who best exemplifies the characteristics of a leader in the community in which she works and lives. 

From then to now, Staley encourages her teams to be active members in their community and is the co-founder of INNERSOLE, an organization that provides new sneakers to children who are homeless and who are in need.

Staley has built her success on a foundation of discipline and vision. She’s a leader on and off the court, using her platform to encourage others to get out of their comfort zone, challenge things that they know are wrong, and not be afraid to talk about hard hitting issues in and outside of sports.

Read more about our Awards >>

2022 Wilma Rudolph Courage Award Recipient

Elana Meyers Taylor

(Photo by Scott Halleran/Getty Images)

Four-time Olympic bobsledder and flag bearer for 2022 Team USA; most decorated Black athlete in Winter Olympics history; advocate for mom-athletes and disability inclusion

Elana Meyers Taylor has brought the heat to bobsled since beginning her career 15 years ago, proving she is a force to be reckoned with and a fierce competitor that handles each awe-inspiring run with courage and determination. From concussions to a partially torn Achilles to testing positive for COVID-19 at one of the global pinnacles of sports, Taylor has proven time and again that she can overcome any and all obstacles thrown her way, for an opportunity to compete that she never takes for granted. What makes her deserving of the Wilma Rudolph Courage Award is not only her grit, determination and undeniable impact she has made within the sports community, but also her efforts to show the world that mom-athletes can compete and win, while using her platform to advocate for racial justice and disability inclusion. 

She is a four-time Olympic bobsledder and was flag bearer for Team USA in the 2022 Beijing Winter Games. After earning two historic podium finishes in 2022, Taylor has become the most decorated Black athlete in Winter Olympic history with five medals. Her ability to pilot the d-rings have landed her three silver and two bronze medals since her first Winter Games in 2010. In addition, Taylor is a four-time World Champion, eight-time World Championships medalist, and 2015 World Cup Champion in bobsled. In fact, she has medaled at every single bobsled competition she has ever competed in.

Taylor is a naturally gifted athlete with a knack to compete in many sports. She knew from the young age of nine that she wanted to be an Olympian. Her athletic career began on the softball field, attending George Washington University on a softball scholarship and playing professionally for the Mid-Michigan Ice. She tried out for the U.S. Olympic Softball Team, calling it ‘the worst tryout ever in the history of tryouts’ and thought her long-time Olympic dream was over. It was her parents who saw bobsled on TV and encouraged her to give it a try. That turned out to be great advice. 

Her courage to trade in her cleats for spikes has allowed her to accomplish many firsts in the sport of bobsled. In 2015, she made history, becoming the first woman to earn a spot on the U.S. National Team competing with the men as a four-man bobsled pilot. Additionally, she went on to become the first woman to win a medal in international competition in a men’s event. 

She is a champion on and off the ice, never yielding and always striving to find ways to remain competitive. She has strong ties to the Women’s Sports Foundation, serving as our President in 2019 and being a former grant recipient. She also served a six-year term as an athlete director on the USA Bobsled and Skeleton Board of Directors and is currently a mentor for Classroom Champions.

Taylor’s most rewarding role is mother to son, Nico, who was born with down syndrome and profound hearing loss. Using her platform, she advocates for equity and inclusion in sports and society. Taylor joined the Georgia Council on Developmental Disabilities to advocate for inclusive education for children with disabilities. And as the nation learned of COVID-19 impacting her ability to carry the flag into the 2022 Winter Games opening ceremony, she shared the daily challenge and journey to recovery, citing the inspiration of her son to push herself through the obstacles. Carrying the flag in the closing ceremony was a well-deserved and powerful conclusion to that journey.  

From bobsled tracks to motherhood, Taylor deftly navigates the twists and turns with courage and determination. She inspires and encourages reaching for your best, and the need for equity and inclusivity for all.

Read more about our Awards >>

2021 Sportswoman of the Year – Team Award Recipient

Jordan Larson

Photo by Sean M. Haffey/Getty Images

When the U.S. Women’s National Volleyball Team won their first Olympic gold medal at the Tokyo Games, Jordan Larson was the one to score the winning point. When her kill made contact with the court, Larson collapsed to the floor in pure joy and was embraced by her teammates. Larson, who has been team captain since 2017, had finally achieved her dream of being an Olympic gold medalist. The U.S. women swept Brazil, who had never lost an Olympic final before, 3-0 (25-21, 25-20, 25-14). Larson’s incredible performance, including being named both Olympic Most Valuable Player and best outside hitter of this historic team, is why she is this year’s WSF Team Sportswoman of the Year Award winner. 

Larson is one of the premier all-around players in her sport. She has an exceptionally high IQ on the court which has easily earned the respect of teammates and competitors alike. The past year has been especially momentous for Larson, adding gold medals and championship titles to her impressive list of accolades. With the inaugural season of the Athlete Unlimited volleyball league in February of 2021, Larson was finally able to play professionally in the United States for the first time. Larson was not only the first player to sign with the new league, she was the inaugural season’s champion after earning 4,569 points over the five-week-long season. In June, Larson won her first gold medal of the year in the 2021 FIVB Volleyball Women’s Nations League finals. The U.S. women’s team beat the Brazilian squad 3-1 (26–28, 25–23, 25–23, 25–21) to claim the gold. And just a few months earlier, in 2020, Larson became one of the youngest members to be inducted into the University of Nebraska Hall of Fame. While she was a Husker, Larson won a national championship in 2006, and in 2008 she became the first woman in Big 12 history to be named the league’s Player of the Year and Defensive Player of the Year in the same season. 

Now a three-time Olympian, winning silver and bronze medals in the 2012 and 2016 Olympics, Larson has played professionally in Puerto Rico, Russia, Turkey, China and the United States. To sustain her on this inspiring journey, she treasures every challenge along the way and proudly wears the “Play For Kae” tattoo on her left wrist in memory of her mom, who lost her fight to breast cancer in 2009. 

Read more about our Awards >>

2021 Sportswoman of the Year Award – Individual Recipient

Allyson Felix

Photo by David Ramos/Getty Images

World record holder, 11-time Olympic medalist, 18-time World Championship medalist over the course of her two-decades-long career, a historic performance at the 2020 Tokyo Games. Allyson Felix is a powerhouse, and this year’s WSF Individual Sportswoman of the Year Award winner.

In Tokyo, Felix earned a bronze medal in the 400-meter race — her first Olympic event since giving birth to her daughter, Camryn, in 2018 — breaking her own 400-meter W 35 (women athletes between the ages of 35–39) masters athletic record in the process. She followed up that strong performance by helping the U.S. women’s 4×400-meter relay team win the gold medal the following day with the fifth-fastest time in the event’s history. Since she stated prior to the 2020 Olympic Games her intention to retire before the 2024 Games, winning gold in her final Olympic race was especially meaningful for Felix, as it moved her ahead of Carl Lewis to become the most decorated American track & field Olympian in history.

At this stage of her career, Felix also has found passions off the track, which she believes are her true calling. She is driven by all of her experiences — as athlete, mom and social justice advocate — to use her voice to create change for mom-athletes and all women who are striving to successfully combine their professional careers and motherhood. Earlier this year she launched her own footwear company, Saysh, designed for and by women, which she wore during her historic Tokyo performance. Through her advocacy and increasing awareness of the challenges mom-athletes face in sport, Felix helped inspire the Power of She: Child Care Grant, a new program launched in partnership with Athleta and the Women’s Sports Foundation to help support mom-athletes and allow them to compete without barriers. Additionally, Felix serves on the board of Right To Play, raising awareness for underserved children in developing regions, as well as &Mother, which envisions “a culture where motherhood is not a limiting factor in how women succeed professionally or personally.” 

Having accomplished so much through sport, Felix says that her true, greatest achievement and greatest love is her daughter, who reminds her every day that she can never stop fighting for what is right in this world. She continues to strive for greatness in all areas, demonstrating that we all can achieve things we have never even dreamed of.

Read more about our Awards >>

2021 Champion For Equality Award Recipient

Larry Scott

Photo by Leon Bennett/Getty Images

Throughout his career, Larry Scott has been a bold, innovative leader with a vision for transformative change. From fighting for equal prize money at Wimbledon to creating the Pac-12 Networks, which exponentially grew the broadcast of collegiate women’s sports, and co-creating a fund designed to recruit and retain more women in collegiate coaching — these achievements and more propelled Larry Scott to be named our 2021 Champion for Equality Award recipient.

In his most recent role as Pac-12 Commissioner, Scott orchestrated an unprecedented revitalization of the conference, including but not limited to: transforming both its men’s and women’s basketball tournaments into must-attend events; creating Pac-12 Networks, the first integrated media company owned by a collegiate conference, and one that dramatically increased exposure for women’s and Olympic sports. Scott also was the impetus for the WSF to honor the remarkable career of Stanford Women’s Basketball Coach, Tara VanDerveer. In partnership with the WSF, he established the Tara VanDerveer Fund for the Advancement of Women in Coaching, specifically designed to help build the pipeline of women coaches – a critical need, given the paucity of women in collegiate coaching positions. 

Prior to joining the Pac-12, Scott served for six years as Chairman and CEO of the Sony Ericsson Women’s Tennis Association (WTA) Tour, where he helped generate unprecedented growth and popularity for women’s professional tennis on a global scale. Scott worked with WSF Founder Billie Jean King and others to achieve the long-sought goal of equal prize money for women in tennis’ grand slam events. He also became the architect of the largest-ever sponsorship in both women’s sports and professional tennis, a six-year $88-million title sponsorship agreement with Sony Ericsson. His many other WTA achievements include the largest television deal in women’s tennis history, a reform package that led to a 40 percent increase in prize money and $750 million in facilities investments, and a partnership with UNESCO to support gender equity around the world.

Larry Scott has been a finalist for the Sports Executive of the Year Award given by Sports Business Journal and was awarded the Vision Award by Cynopsis Sports. He was also honored with the Americanism Award by the Anti-Defamation League, in tribute to his mission of fostering positive change through sports, and where he currently serves as Vice Chair of the Board of Directors.

Read more about our Awards >>

2021 Wilma Rudolph Courage Award Recipient

Naomi Osaka

Photo by Graham Denholm/Getty Images

Tennis pro, trendsetter, activist, mental health advocate, and history maker, are just a few monikers that describe our 2021 Wilma Rudolph Courage Award recipient, Naomi Osaka.  

Since breaking into the professional tennis circuit with her powerful serve and strong forehand in 2013, Osaka has become a four-time Grand Slam champion – winning both the US Open and the Australian Open twice. Osaka is the first Asian player to hold the WTA world number one ranking in singles, and the first Japanese player to win a Grand Slam. Representing her native country of Japan, Osaka was bestowed the prestigious honor of lighting the Cauldron at the opening ceremony for the 2020 Tokyo Olympic Games.

Osaka has become known as a voice in activism on and off the court. She ceaselessly uses her platform and her voice to advocate for social change, gender equity in sport, and mental health. During last year’s Western and Southern Open she withdrew from playing, helping to raise awareness for the tragic deaths of Jacob Blake, Tamir Rice and many other Black men and women. Her powerful message on social media resulted in the tournament pausing play for 24 hours: “Before I am an athlete, I am a black woman. And as a black woman I feel as though there are much more important matters at hand that need immediate attention, rather than watching me play tennis.” 

Three days later, Osaka walked into Arthur Ashe Stadium wearing a black face covering. It bore the name Breonna Taylor, a Black woman who was fatally shot by police. Over the course of the US Open, Osaka wore a different mask for each of her seven victories. Each mask commemorating a Black person who was a victim of violence. Osaka emerged as the champion of the US Open, lifting the trophy to honor Black lives and making a bold statement against racism and inequality.

Earlier this year, Osaka took a stand for her own mental well-being and in so doing, brought world-wide attention to the topic of mental health and the challenges elite athletes face. Expectations, constant demand, the weight of perfectionism, can all spur anxiety. Heralded by the fans as you rise, yet the cheers can turn in a moment, when you falter. The courage to put her mental well-being first, Osaka received accolades from health-care professionals, appreciation from fellow athletes across sports, and she spurred the general public to stop and think about mental health. Courage and character beyond her 23 years. 

Pursuing passion and achievements off the court as well, Osaka made her debut at New York Fashion Week in 2020, showcasing a collection she co-designed with Adeam, and just recently served as co-host of the 2021 MET Gala. Osaka is also an entrepreneur, recently launching a skincare brand named KINLO, in homage to her bicultural heritage (Kin and Lo meaning ‘gold’ in Japanese and Haitian Creole, respectively.) 

Osaka is a three-time member of Time’s annual list of the100 most influential people in the world, and was named one of the 2020 Sports Illustrated Sportspersons of the Year, an Ad Week Most Powerful Woman in Sports. 

Read more about our Awards >>

2021 Billie Jean King Leadership Award Recipient

Kim Ng

Photo by Michael Reaves/Getty Images

Each year the Billie Jean King Leadership award is presented to an individual who has demonstrated outstanding leadership and made significant contributions to the advancement of women through achievements in sports and the workplace. This year we honor Kim Ng, the Miami Marlins General Manager, for her excellence, persistence and commitment to breaking down barriers in sports. 

Ng joined the Marlins organization in November 2020, becoming the fifth person in club history to hold the top position in baseball operations. She is the highest-ranking woman in baseball operations among the 30 MLB teams, the highest-ranking Asian-American female baseball executive, and the first woman hired to the general manager position by any of the professional men’s sports teams in the North American major leagues.

A recognized trailblazer, Ng has more than 30 years in Major League Baseball, including a combined 21 years of experience in the front offices for the Chicago White Sox (1990-96), New York Yankees (1998- 2001), and Los Angeles Dodgers (2002-11). She has been an integral part of eight postseason appearances, including six league championship series and three World Championships (all with the Yankees, 1998-2000). Prior to the Marlins, Ng spent nine years as Senior Vice President of Baseball Operations with MLB, where she directed international baseball operations, working with the front offices of the 30 major league clubs and many other baseball leagues and entities around the world. Ng also focused her efforts on growing the game of baseball, leading MLB’s efforts to improve the quality of play, caliber of talent, and rate of participation for amateur baseball around the world while also supervising MLB playing initiatives for girls and women. Additionally, she served on MLB’s Diversity Pipeline Advisory Committee.

Ng has appeared on Forbes’ list of the Most Influential Minorities in Sports, Forbes’ list of the Most Influential Women in Sports, and Adweek’s Most Powerful Women in Sports. Most recently, she was named one of InStyle Magazine’s Badass 50 Women, and was included among the South Florida Business Journal’s Power Leaders. Ng serves on the Anti-Defamation League’s Sports Leadership Council, and took part in the 2021 Presidential Inauguration as part of the Celebrating America event.

Read more about our Awards >>

International Women’s Sports Hall of Fame

Founded in 1980, the International Women’s Sports Hall of Fame honors history-making female athletes and coaches. International athletes are selected based on personal achievements, breakthroughs, innovative style and ongoing commitment to the development of women’s sports.

The Women’s Sports Foundation is owner and operator of the International Women’s Sports Hall of Fame.

Criteria:

The Hall of Fame recognizes the athletic achievements of those who have competed at least 25 years prior to the present year in the Pioneer category. Athletes whose accomplishments came within the past 25 years are inducted into the Contemporary category. In 1990, the Coach category was added and honors both active and retired coaches.

P = Pioneer
C = Contemporary
H = Coach

Patty Berg, Golf (P)1980
Amelia Earhart, Aviation (P)1980
Gertrude Ederle, Swimming (P)1980
Althea Gibson, Tennis, Golf (P)1980
Janet Guthrie, Auto Racing (C)1980
Billie Jean King, Tennis (C)1980
Wilma Rudolph, Track & Field (C)1980
Eleanor Holm Whalen, Swimming (P)1980
Mildred "Babe" Didrickson Zaharias, Track & Field, Golf (P)1980
Chris Evert, Tennis (C)1981
Peggy Fleming Jenkins, Figure Skating (C)1981
Sheila Young Ochowicz, Speedskating (C)1981
Wyomia Tyus, Track & Field (C)1981
Glenna Collett Vare, Golf (P)1981
Mickey Wright, Golf (C)1981
Francina Blankers-Koen, Track & Field (P)1982
Sonja Henie, Figure Skating (P)1982
Olga Korbut, Gymnastics (C)1982
Carol Mann, Golf (C)1982
Annemarie Moser-Proell, Skiing (C)1982
Tenley Albright, Figure Skating (P)1983
Donna de Varona, Swimming (C)1983
Col. Micki King, Diving (C)1983
Andrea Mead Lawrence, Skiing (P)1983
Helen Stephens, Track & Field (P)1983
Marion Ladewig, Bowling (P)1984
Suzanne Lenglen, Tennis (P)1984
Pat McCormick, Diving (P)1984
Martina Navratilova, Tennis (C)1984
Eleanora Sears, Polo, Golf, Squash (P)1984
Kathy Whitworth, Golf (C)1984
Ann Curtis Cuneo, Swimming (P)1985
Dawn Fraser, Swimming (C)1985
Larisa Latynina, Gymnastics (P)1985
Ann Meyers-Drysdale, Basketball (C)1985
Tracy Caulkins-Stockwell, Swimming (C)1986
Margaret Court, Tennis (C)1986
Charlotte Dod, Tennis, Archery, Golf (P)1986
Flo Hyman, Volleyball (C)1986
Betsy Rawls, Golf (P)1986
Hazel Hotchkiss Wightman, Tennis (P)1986
JoAnne Carter, Golf (C)1987
Maureen Connolly, Tennis (P)1987
Marie Marvingt, Aviation, Mountaineering (P)1987
Madeline Manning Mims, Track & Field (C)1987
Louise Suggs, Golf (P)1987
Ludmilla Tourischeva, Gymnastics (C)1987
Debbie Meyer Weber, Swimming (C)1987
Margaret Murdock, Shooting (C)1988
Irirna Rodnina, Figure Skating (C)1988
Aileen Riggin Soule, Diving, Swimming (P)1988
Wilye White, Track & Field (C)1988
Theresa Weld Blanchard, Figure Skating (P)1989
Evonne Goolagong Cawley, Tennis (C)1989
Joan Joyce, Softball (C)1989
Ilona Schacherer-Elek, Fencing (P)1989
Nadia Comaneci, Gymnastics (C)1990
Willa McGuire Cook, Water Skiing (P)1990
Nell Jackson, Track & Field (H)1990
Connie Carpenter Phinney, Cycling (C)1990
Pat Head Summitt, Basketball (H)1990
Constance Applebee, Field Hockey (H)1991
Vera Caslavska, Gymnastics (C)1991
Christl Cranz, Alpine Skiing (P)1991
Alice Coachman Davis, Track & Field (P)1991
Muriel Grossfield, Gymnastics (H)1991
Cheryl Miller, Basketball (C)1991
Ludmila Belousova-Protopopova, Figure Skating (C)
1992
Bessie Coleman, Aviation (P)1992
Carol Heis Jenkins, Figure Skating (P)1992
Irena Kirszenstein Szewinska, Track & Field (C)
1992
Margaret Wade, Basketball (H)1992
Sharron Backus, Softball (H)1993
Kornelia Ender, Swimming (C)1993
Mary T. Meagher, Swimming (C)1993
Kit Klein Outland, Speedskating (P)1993
Mary Lou Retton, Gymnastics (C)1993
Toni Stone, Baseball (P)1993
Chi Cheng, Track & Field (C)1994
Liz Hartel, Equestrian (P)1994
Rena "Rusty" Kanokogi, Judo (H)1994
Jody Conradt, Basketball (H)1995
Judy Devlin Hashman, Badminton (P)1995
Betty Hicks, Golf (P)1995
Barbara Jacket, Track & Field (H)1995
Annichen Kringstad, Orienteering (C)1995
Grete Waitz, Marathon Running (C)1995
Florence Chadwick, Swimming (P)1996
Dianne Holum, Speedskating (H)1996
Lydia Skoblikova, Speedskating (C)1996
Mae Faggs Starr, Track & Field (P) 1996
Evelyn Ashford, Track & Field (C)1997
Diana Golden Brosnihan, Skiing (C)1997
Gail Emery, Synchronized Swimming (H)1997
Barbara Ann Scott-King, Figure Skating (P)1997
Shirley Strickland de la Hunty, Track & Field (P)1998
Margaret Osborne DuPont, Tennis (P)1998
Florence Griffith Joyner, Track & Field (C)1998
Dorothy Hamill, Figure Skating (C)1998
Tara VanDerveer, Basketball (H)1998
Tina Sloan Green, Lacrosse (H)1999
Sandra Haynie, Golf (C)1999
Betty Jameson, Golf (P)1999
Joan Benoit Samuelson, Marathon Running (C)1999
Shirley Babashoff, Swimming (C)2000
Chris Carver, Synchronized Swimming (H)2000
Marjorie Jackson-Nelson, Track & Field (P)2000
Tracie Ruiz-Conforto, Synchronized Swimming (C)2000
Bonnie Blair, Speedskating (C)2001
Janet Evans, Swimming (C)2001
Mabel Fairbanks, Figure Skating (H)2001
Agnes Keleti-Biro, Gymnastics (P)2001
Valerie Brisco-Hooks, Track & Field (C)2002
Betty Cuthbert, Track & Field (P)2002
Nikki Tomlinson Franke, Fencing (H)2002
Jayne Torvill, Ice Dancing (C)2002
Min Gao, Diving (C)2003
Jackie Joyner-Kersee, Track & Field (C)2003
Heather McKay, Squash, Racquetball (P)2003
Linda Vollstedt, Golf (H)2003
Maria Esther Bueno, Tennis (P)2004
Nancy Hogshead-Makar, Swimming (C)2004
Beverly Kearney, Track & Field (H)2004
Lusia Harris Steward, Basketball (P)2005
Katarina Witt, Figure Skating (C)2005
Marjorie Wright, Softball (H)2005
Nawal El Moutawakel, Track & Field (C)2006
Shane Gould, Swimming (P)2006
Diana Nyad, Swimming (P)2006
C. Vivian Stringer, Basketball (H)2006
Hassiba Boulmerka, Track & Field (C)2008
Sue Enquist, Softball (H)2008
Hisako "Chako" Higuchi, Golf (P)2008
Shannon Miller, Gymnastics (C)2008