Health

Peanutty Energy Bars

This recipe offers a delicious alternative to commercial energy bars, which can get expensive if not bought in bulk. These homemade bars are perfect for a burst of energy on the spot during a workout, as well as for a satisfying afternoon snack.

While the bars are relatively high in fat, it's healthful fat from peanuts and sunflower seeds. If you'd like some variety, make this recipe with cashews and cashew butter, and add a variety of dried fruits like cranberries, cherries, and dates.

Ingredients:
1/2 cup salted dry-roasted peanuts
1/2 cup roasted sunflower seed kernels, or use more peanuts or other nuts
1/2 cup raisins or other dried fruit
2 cups  uncooked oatmeal, old-fashioned or instant
2 cups toasted rice cereal, such as Rice Krispies
1/2 cup peanut butter, crunchy or creamy
1/2 cup packed brown sugar
1/2 cup light corn syrup
1 teaspoon vanilla
Optional: 1/4 cup toasted wheat germ

Preparation:

Mix together the first six ingredients in a medium bowl. Set aside. Combine peanut butter, brown sugar and corn syrup in a large bowl. Microwave on high for two minutes. Add vanilla and stir until blended. Add dry ingredients from medium bowl. Stir until coated. Spoon mixture into an eight-inch square pan coated with non-stick spray. Press down firmly (It helps to spray fingers with nonstick spray). Let stand about 1 hour. Cut into bars, and enjoy!

Recipe courtesy of Epicurious.com

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