Sports

Watch: Jennie Finch pleads the IOC to Back Softball

WSF Athlete Advisory Panel member Jennie Finch delivered an impassioned speech at the International Olympic Committee's (IOC) Women and Sports Conference in Los Angeles this weekend. Finch, who is a member of the U.S. Olympic Team and an International Softball Federation (ISF) women's world champion, was accepting the 'Power of I' award for her charity work as well as her inspiration of female athletes worldwide.

Watch as Jennie shares her story and encourages everyone to “Back Softball."

Back Softball is the ISF’s initiative to get the sport added to the Olympic roster; it was cut after the 2008 Beijing Games for not having enough of a “global presence.” In July 2011, the IOC announced a list of eight sports from which they will select one(via a vote in 2013) to be added to the 2020 Olympic Games. We are thrilled to see softball as one of those candidate sports. The game is currently played in 127 countries and softball — either women’s, men’s, or both — is on the program of at least 15 different multi-sport games, like the Pan American Games, Asian Games and World Masters Games.

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