Health

Get Girls Active, Part Four: Buddy Up: The Importance of Teamwork

The most important thing you can do to inspire a girl is to make everything a team effort. A girl is more likely to be active if her parent, guardian or other key adult in her life is active. Let her see you working out, sweating and making physical activity part of your life. Be a real-life hero as she sees you jogging that extra lap, attempting that 3-point shot, striking that yoga pose. There are a number of ways you can emphasize that you are in this together:

1. Keep activity logs. This is a great way to track progress. Have fun picking out a cool diary or journal and then keep track of your physical activity experiences: What you did, for how long and how intense it was. Also record your feelings about what you liked and didn't like about the experience. This will help to plan and schedule the next activity and help you get to know on another.

2. Start an activity bracelet that includes balls and activity charms that commemorate the activities you tried and did together.

3. Take a class together. Look for a class that interests both of you, like yoga, Pilates or tae kwon do.

4. Show her your moves. Teach her to enjoy the activities that you enjoy now or did as a child. Recruit some rope turners and try double-dutch. Or show her your old dance moves to some retro music. She'll admire you for having the guts to try something you haven't enjoyed in years.

Get Girls Active, Part 3: Keep It Fun!
Get Girls Active, Part 2: Changing Attitudes About Physical Activity
Get Girls Active, Part 1: What Does it Mean to be Physically Active?

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