EDUCATION

WSF Senior Director of Advocacy, Nancy Hogshead-Makar, talks Title IX on MSNBC

WSF Senior Director of Advocacy, Nancy Hogshead-Makar, talks Title IX on MSNBC from Womens Sports Foundation on Vimeo.

On June 24, the day after the 40th anniversary of Title IX, Nancy Hogshead-Makar, WSF Senior Director of Advocacy, Professor of Law and three-time Olympic gold medalist, was interviewed by MSNBC about the landmark legislation. Public support for Title IX is currently at 80%, a large jump from when the law was passed, but we are not there yet. Watch as Hogshead-Makar speaks about the Science, Technology, Engineering, and Medicine (STEM) program, which aims to get more girls into the fields that are so vital to our economy. She explains that studies have shown that girls who play high school sports are more likely to pursue these prestigious fields.

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