Sports

Racewalking, but Not to London

Elite racewalker Erin Taylor-Talcott recently achieved a qualifying time for the 2012 Olympic trials in the 50-kilometer distance. Great, right? One catch: the 50-k race is not on the Olympic program for women – she qualified for the men’s trials.

On Wednesday, Taylor-Talcott gained provisional entry into the men’s trials and perhaps became the first woman to do so. Taylor-Talcott can compete in the 50K Olympic trials as a so-called guest upon agreeing not to try to participate in the men’s event at the London Games, the national governing body said.

In conversations over the past week, Taylor-Talcott had expressed frustration over her inability to get direct answers from track and field officials about the status of her eligibility for the Olympic trials.

“They’re afraid I’ll beat a bunch of guys, and that’ll be embarrassing,” she said Tuesday. “My response to the guys is, ‘Go faster.’ They should be saying, ‘We have a girl that’s pretty good at 50K; let’s be proud.’”

Read the full story here.

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