Sports

One Powerful Mother-Daughter Duo

The mother-daughter duo of Sloane Stephens and Sybil Smith is, like Coco and Tauna Vandeweghe, one we are keeping our eyes on. Sloane, who just won her US Open match against Israeli ranked player Shahar Peer yesterday at Flushing Meadows, is an up-and-comer on the WTA Tour. Throughout the nineteen year history of swimming at Boston University, no one individual earned the accolades and honors that Sybil Stephens did. She is also a longtime supporter of the Foundation, having attended many Annual Salutes to Women in Sports throughout the years. Learn more:

Sybil Smith Bio: Recognized as the finest swimmer in Boston University history, Sybil Smith reached the pinnacle of her career with the Terriers in her final competition, the 1988 NCAA Championships. There, she placed sixth in the 100-yard backstroke with a school-record time of 56:02. By finishing among the top eight in the event, Smith was recognized as a First Team Division I All-American. She was the first black woman in the nation to accomplish that feat, and she remains Boston University's only All-American in women's swimming.

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