Huffington Post: How to Raise an Athlete

A mother and daughter practice basketball skills together at a neighborhood playground.

Research finds that when children participate in sports, it helps them learn coordination, leadership skills, how to work in a group, cope with frustration, acquire physical strength and develop communication skills. These findings are all part of what we stand for at the Women's Sports Foundation and why we work so hard to get girls active at an early age.

However, a child's participation in sports is strongly affected by the parent’s attitude and behavior toward the sport, the coach and other kids on the team. A new piece on HuffingtonPost.com explores how parents can help their children have fun in sports while becoming the best athlete they can be.

Read the full article here.

Our Mission

The Women’s Sports Foundation is a non-profit that advances the lives of women through sports and physical activity.

About the Foundation

RELATED POSTS

GoGirlGo! Curriculum: Brandi Chastain talks eating disorders, body image issues

With eleven million people currently battling eating disorders and the average onset as early as nine years old, the numbers are staggering. We often look to female athletes for possessing the most powerful -- and many times, the most beautiful bodies -- on the planet. It would seem certain that these athletes would be immune to eating disorders or poor body image. This is simply not so, as we found out in soccer star Brandi Chastain's turn in our award-winning GoGirlGo! curriculum.

Stressors in the home may be linked to a rise in obesity among young girls

Recent studies have shown that girls who grow up in stressful environments where violence, depression, or other disturbances are prevalent are more likely to become obese by five years old, as opposed to children who live in steady homes. Further, according to Medical Journal Pediatrics, preschool girls who are exposed to these unfortunate circumstances have an even higher risk of becoming obese.

Obesity Associated with Lower Academic Achievement in Teenage Girls, Says New Study

It seems like every week new research is released about the far-reaching negative effects of childhood obesity. Now, British researchers have found a correlation between obesity in teen girls and poor performance in the classroom.