Huffington Post: How to Raise an Athlete

A mother and daughter practice basketball skills together at a neighborhood playground.

Research finds that when children participate in sports, it helps them learn coordination, leadership skills, how to work in a group, cope with frustration, acquire physical strength and develop communication skills. These findings are all part of what we stand for at the Women's Sports Foundation and why we work so hard to get girls active at an early age.

However, a child's participation in sports is strongly affected by the parent’s attitude and behavior toward the sport, the coach and other kids on the team. A new piece on HuffingtonPost.com explores how parents can help their children have fun in sports while becoming the best athlete they can be.

Read the full article here.

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The Women’s Sports Foundation is a non-profit that advances the lives of women through sports and physical activity.

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